Home Fire Safety

Fire Is Deadly

Fires and burns kill hundreds of children each year and permanently scar thousands more. Yet more fire victims die from smoke than flames.

Smoke can overwhelm a child or adult in minutes.

How would you get out of your home in case of fire? How about your children? How would they escape from a second or third floor? Plan fire escape routes and practice them.

Draw a simple picture of your home. Plan two ways to get out of every room. Agree on an outside meeting place. Decide who'll take charge of each child. Discuss the plan with your family. Practice escapes at night. That's when most deadly fire occur

NOTE: Show children who live in high-rise buildings the shortest route to a safe exit. Warn them not to use the elevator.

Have a Home Escape Plan

  • Know two ways out of every room in your house (doors and windows).
  • Stay low and go to the nearest exit.
  • Feel closed doors with the back of your hand (if hot do not open) go to the second exit.
  • Get out and stay out!
  • Have a meeting place outside away from your home.
  • Call 911 from your neighbor’s house.
  • Have a fire drill twice a year.

TENGA UN PLAN DE EVACUACIÓN DE CASA

  • Conozca dos maneras de salir de cada cuarto de su casa (puertas y ventanas).
  • Gatee por debajo del humo y vaya a la salida más cercana.
  • Toque la puerta cerrada con la parte de atrás de la mano antes de abrirla (si esta caliente no la abra) vaya a la segunda salida.
  • ¡Salga afuera y manténgase afuera!
  • Tenga un lugar de reunión afuera, lejos de su casa.
  • Llame al 911 de la casa de su vecino.
  • Practique un simulacro de incendio con la familia dos veces al año.

 

Protect your family

  • Install smoke detectors outside all sleeping areas and on every level of your home.
  • Test them monthly following manufacturers' instructions.
  • Change batteries at least once a year - even if they are still working.
  • Caution: Never remove batteries for use in toys, a flashlight, or radio.

The Overall Fire Picture - 2005 Statistics

  • 83 percent of all civilian fire deaths occurred in residences.
  • Fire killed more Americans than all natural disasters combined.
  • There were 17,925 civilian injuries that occurred as the result of fire.
  • There were 115 firefighters killed while on duty.
  • More fire victims die from smoke than flames.
  • Smoke can overwhelm a child or adult in minutes.

Who is E.D.I.T.H.?

E.D.I.T.H. stands for Exit Drills In The Home. Having a planned route of escape could mean the difference between life and tragedy in the event of a house fire.

Smoke Alarms:

Install smoke detectors outside all sleeping areas and on every level of your home.
Test them monthly following manufacturers' instructions.
Change batteries at least once a year - even if they are still working.
Never remove batteries for use in toys, a flashlight, or radio.

Juvenile Fire Setters

The United States Fire Administration (USFA) reports that roughly 13% of all fires reported to local fire departments are intentionally set, resulting in 375 deaths, 1,300 injuries and a billion dollars in damages annually. According to the USFA, children between the ages of three and five have a natural curiosity about fire and that, during these impressionable years, it is imperative to educate children about fire safety. The Tucson Fire Department is happy to assist you in educating your child about the dangers and consequences associated with fire play. If you are concerned about a childs fascination with fire, please contact one of the following:

Children ages 7 or younger please contact Pubilc Safety Education Specialist Mandy Hart at 837-7092

Children ages 8 to 17, including all court ordered cases, please contact Inspector Tom Sisterman at 837-7121 

 

SAFETY AT HOME

Scalds and Burns

Prevent scalds in the bathroom:

  • Test how "hot" your hot water is. Turn on the hot water at the tub faucet. Let it run for 3 to 5 minutes.
  • Measure the temperature with a hot water gauge or mercury thermometer. (Liquid crystal bath thermometers are available for a few dollars.)
  • Set the water heater's thermostat to low, warm, or 120oF. Wait a day. Test the water again. Repeat, if necessary. Your clothes and dishes will get clean at this setting!
  • Install anti-scald devices in your shower and bathtub fixtures that stop the water flow when the temperature exceeds 120oF.
  • Always check the water temperature before placing your child in the tub. A child's skin burns more easily than an adult's.
  • Supervise kids in the tub. Young children can turn the hot water on by themselves. Older children can scald a younger child.
  • Never apply anything but water to cool a burn. Applying other items could result in more serious injury and/or permanent scarring.

NOTE: If you rent, ask your landlord to lower the water temperature or put an anti-scald device in your shower and bathtub fixtures.

Prevent scalds in the kitchen:

  • Keep hot foods and drinks away from the edge of tables and counters. Do not put them on a tablecloth that little hands can yank.
  • Don't hold your child too if you're cooking or holding something hot
  • Keep your child away from the stove.
  • Turn pot handles toward the back of the stove. If possible, use rear burners.
  • Watch for dangling appliance cords on crock-pots, irons and other appliances.
  • Never apply anything but water to cool a burn. Applying other items could result in more serious injury and/or permanent scarring.

Fire Proofing Your Yard

The dry, mild climate here in Tucson is by far one of our greatest assets, however the dry weather greatly increases our risk for brush fires. Taking simple steps to fireproof the perimeter of your home could prevent costly property damage, and could potentially save lives.

  • Trim branches that overhang your house.
  • Trim the branches back to at least 10 feet from your house.
  • This is especially important near your chimney and heater vents. If you need to trim branches or remove trees near power lines, call TEP prior to trimming. This will save you time and money in the event of a mishap.

Clear your property of brush to 30? from the house or to the property line on all sides, whichever is closer. This does not include plants and bushes that make up the landscaping around your house. Brush fire spreads rapidly from the ground to the trees if there is an abundance of undergrowth.

Clearing the brush will add value to property by providing a buffer of defensible space and will keep your property attractive and looking well maintained.
Keep your roof and rain gutters clean. Leaves, needles and branches on a roof or in the rain gutters may catch an ember and start a roof fire